Shyamnath gollakota thesis

shyam gollakota

By understanding the parameters of this mixing, we can invert the mixing and decode the interfered packets; thus, making interference harmless.

Building on this approach, we make four main contributions: We present the first WiFi receiver that can successfully reconstruct the transmitted information in the presence of packet collisions.

We then show how we can harness interference to improve security.

rajalakshmi nandakumar

Furthermore, we can control this mixing process to create strategic interference that allow decodability at a particular receiver of interest, but prevent decodability at unintended receivers and adversaries.

If nearby devices transmit at the same time, their signals interfere, resulting in a collision.

Finally, we present a solution that establishes secure connections between any two WiFi devices, without having users enter passwords or use pre-shared secret keys. For this reason, wireless networks have been designed with the assumption that interference is intrinsically harmful and must be avoided. Building on this approach, we make four main contributions: We present the first WiFi receiver that can successfully reconstruct the transmitted information in the presence of packet collisions. Though he had done some networking research as an undergraduate, he was pleasantly surprised when he received a call from Prof. Katabi joined her students — including Shyam Gollakota — in taking classes to learn material in other domains such as digital wireless circuit design and compressive sensing. I believe this is just as important for systems research as is coming up with new ideas. In fact, Prof. Next, we introduce a WiFi receiver design that can decode in the presence of high-power cross-technology interference from devices like baby monitors, cordless phones, microwave ovens, or even unknown technologies. As a computer science undergraduate student at IIT Madras, Shyam Gollakota was well aware that his research interests at the time in security and cryptography would be well served by continuing as a graduate student at MIT. In particular, we develop the first system that secures an insecure medical implant without any modification to the implant itself.

I think this is where the future is heading. Hence, we can transform interference into a beneficial phenomenon that provides security. To achieve this goal, we consider how wireless signals interact when they interfere, and use this understanding in our system designs.

university of washington computer science

This book, a revised version of the author's award-winning Ph. Katabi joined her students — including Shyam Gollakota — in taking classes to learn material in other domains such as digital wireless circuit design and compressive sensing. As a computer science undergraduate student at IIT Madras, Shyam Gollakota was well aware that his research interests at the time in security and cryptography would be well served by continuing as a graduate student at MIT.

Gollakota also loves working with students, both in the classroom and in the lab.

For this reason, wireless networks have been designed with the assumption that interference is intrinsically harmful and must be avoided. In particular, we develop the first system that secures an insecure medical implant without any modification to the implant itself. If nearby devices transmit at the same time, their signals interfere, resulting in a collision. To achieve this goal, we consider how wireless signals interact when they interfere, and use this understanding in our system designs. As a computer science undergraduate student at IIT Madras, Shyam Gollakota was well aware that his research interests at the time in security and cryptography would be well served by continuing as a graduate student at MIT. Such communication would also scale and work in locations previously unfeasible and also be used in personal health and fitness devices and new applications waiting to be created. Since wireless signals do not require line-of-sight and can traverse through walls, he and his group have achieved the first gesture recognition system that works in those situations.
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Shyam Gollakota