Rhetorical analysis of solitude of walden of henry david thoreau

Just by listening closely to the changing wrought on them by the woods through which they pass, Thoreau can turn the echo of church bells into magic.

Thoreau, in his recorded observations of nature, proves the proposition he makes at the beginning of the chapter -- that intelligent people can avoid boredom by close attention to their environment and actions. Thoreau finds that he has a kind of split personality, where one side of him is a spectator observing what the other side of him is doing. He argues that thanks to all the natural elements he is surrounded by cheerfulness. He doesn't know if the man is wise or ignorant. It is considered as a pamphlet. No matter what questions he asks, Thoreau cannot get the man to look at things spiritually. It is important not to read him as a misanthrope. For example, when Thoreau asks if he could do without money, he describes how difficult it would be for him to buy needles and thread by mortgaging part of an ox. What great value is there in rubbing elbows with other men? Commentary Henry David Thoreau was born in and died in But in his cabin, Thoreau had no "domestic sounds," no roosters, cats, dogs, or even rats in the walls.

He recounts a story of Winslow, a Pilgrim leader at Plymouth, who went to visit Massasoit at his lodge. Thoreau criticizes society for the way it prevents a person from enjoying solitude, which fosters his connection to himself and therefore allows him to create real connections to others.

henry david thoreau rhetorical strategies

Thus, this chapter is not about "solitude," at all, as the term in normally understood. If he has one guest, they share his "frugal meal.

Nature by henry david thoreau analysis

Famous Quotations "Let us first be as simple and well as Nature ourselves, dispel the clouds which hang over our brows, and take up a little life into our pores. He doesn't know if the man is wise or ignorant. We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other. Active Themes Thoreau believes that people are distracted by being polite and that they spend too much time around each other, which actually makes them respect each other less. Transcendentalism, Spirituality, and the Good Life Summary Analysis Walking along the pond, enjoying the animals, Thoreau believes that his solitude makes him a part of nature and therefore allows him to achieve a sense of liberty. Smelling the goods from distant parts on the freight train as it goes past, Thoreau is made to feel like a citizen of the world. Solitude is thus more a state of mind than an actual physical circumstance, and for Thoreau it approaches a mystical state. The sparrow chirps, but there is no clue as to what, if anything, it wishes to communicate. What great value is there in rubbing elbows with other men? He can defend institutions better than a philosopher because his practical contact with them leads him to give the real reason they are necessary.

Chapter Five "Solitude" Summary: On one "delicious" evening, Thoreau walks along the shore of the pond. Though he has had very pleasant visits from all kinds of people, he thinks people are more lonely when they are around other people than when they are alone.

Active Themes From nature, Thoreau gets "the most sweet and tender, the most innocent and encouraging society," which prevents every possible occasion for melancholy.

Just by listening closely to the changing wrought on them by the woods through which they pass, Thoreau can turn the echo of church bells into magic. He argues that thanks to all the natural elements he is surrounded by cheerfulness. Men of business, including farmers, were all concerned about solitude and employment and distance. On the other hand, the woodchopper represents the pure "animal spirit" of man and therefore proves Thoreau's arguments about man as part of nature. Economy, Walden "In any weather, at any hour of the day or night, I have been anxious to improve the nick of time, and notch it on my stick too; to stand on the meeting of two eternities, the past and future, which is precisely the present moment; to toe that line. In recognizing that nature can provide society, Thoreau can likewise have companionship. On Sundays Thoreau hears the bells of churches.

He has found that "society is commonly too cheap. Only once, a few weeks after he moved to the woods, did he worry that being near to other people might be necessary for a happy life, but rain drops on his roof and all the other sounds of nature suddenly began to seem friendly and kindred.

Thoreau remarks that even though his closest neighbor is only a mile away, he may as well be in Asia or Africa, so great is his feeling of solitude.

summary thoreau has to say on the topic of solitude
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SparkNotes: Walden: Sounds and Solitude